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Do characters in a dream have their own separate thoughts or identity?

Do characters in a dream have their own separate thoughts or identity?



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I am very curious as to if any research has been done in this area, or if such a question even can be researched given the current tools and methods available to cognitive scientists. When one dreams, one may experience interactions with other characters, be those characters based on people one knows in their waking life or characters new to the dreamer. I'm interested to understand more about how the interactions between the dreamer within the dream state and these characters inside the dream work.

Do the characters in one's dream actually have their own thoughts? That is, does the mind "sandbox" each character, keeping track of what each dream character is thinking? When characters in a dream speak or act, what determines what actions they will take? Are their words and actions simply based upon a sense of empathy, or does the mind somehow maintain separate "conscious states" for each dream character? (A better word for that is appreciated, if there is one)

Or, as I suspect, is this concept simply too abstract for us to research given our current level of technology and understanding about how dreams work at a fundamental level?

Edit: As an alternative way of asking this question, has any research been done looking for possible relationships between characters within a dream and other better-understood areas of personality, for example multiple personality disorder?


EDIT: To address the changed question:

Similar to how mental visualization stimulates the same neurons/blood flow that actually seeing something does, I suspect that brain scans will show similar processing occuring during the dream interaction as occur during real interactions.

The difference is that the brain is creating the entire subjective experience.

The crazy thought is that there isn't a difference though: subjective experience is ALWAYS completely constructed by the brain, though it's constructed through nerve impulses from external inputs such as electromagnetic waves (sight) or physical waves (sound). During sleep, the body is paralyzed to prevent us from acting out our dreams (which WILL happen if the paralysis is lifted), which implies that sensory data is still coming in (or being generated) and we are simply mis-perceiving it and then trying to catch up.

This was my answer to @alan2here's original question. It mostly still applies, though is also a mixture of philosophy, psychology, and cognitive neurophilosophy (EDIT: i.e. uncited, lol) Take this as you will:


First off, this is definitely a philosophy question, but I'll try to stay within the bounds of Cog Sci. No promises though…

From my understanding, the mind does not create consciousness. While this is a very thorny issue, and one I'm not super familiar with, I believe a generally accepted view is that consciousness is a (by-)product of the sheer complexity of the human brain coupled with governing systems and feedback loops (and a hell of a lot more of course!).

Furthermore, the perceived barrier between the self and separate beings is just that: perception. Differences in physical properties aside, there are no real barriers between anything. Air is just as much a molecule as plastic, and behaves in a remarkably similar manner. The difference is semantics (not unimportant to subjective beings, but objectively the difference is inconsequential). We just can't see it, and we're conditioned to ignore it, so we see a vast gulf of nothingness where there is actually incredible hidden complexity. Also, the notion of self is a misguided one that we're given through culture. As many Eastern philosophies will tell you, the self is a lie! (just like cake).

To address the actualy question though (kinda), I think you unintentionally answered it yourself with this phrase: sentient seeming entities. The 'people' in your dreams are amalgamations of 'people'-like semantic attributes your brain has constructed from your experiences. These seem like real people and can act like real people, but that's because you've met and experienced real people. If you have never met real people, it's very doubtful that any people-like dream constructs will be created (unless generated from mirror reflections).

Lastly, I have to add this caveat: dreams and dream science is still an incredibly unexplored black box. We still don't have a clear idea about why dreams occur and until then, this question is literally unanswerable. In fact, everything I've said may turn out to be false, but we don't really know. That's why this falls under philosophy.

However, I'll leave you with this: assuming that the human mind is an individual entity (and cannot connect with other people through undiscovered mental (physical, likely subatomic and certain microscopic) means), then the people in your dreams do not exist anywhere else nor to anyone else. Therefore: does it matter? It's a completely subjective experience, so only you can decide how to perceive it.


I've done a few experiments during lucid dreams, and i have found 2 different kinds of dream characters.

1) (The Automata) These guys are basically programs. They are there only to further the plot of the dream. If you make any attempt to break them out of the plot they've been put into, they will stop giving sensical answers. They are not conscious. They only know how to answer a few questions and do a few things.

2) (The "People") These are, as far as i can tell, conscious. They act and behave like people, and can do things completely unrelated to the original plot of the dream. They exhibit creativity, since i have heard genuinely funny jokes from them that i never thought of before and that other people find funny. They exhibit a sense of agency, in the since that i am never able to truly "erase" them. Whatever's left after an attempt to erase them will quickly reestablish itself. They have memories independent to my own, ones that i confirm are real after reading older entries in my dream journal. They also exhibit free will, in the since that they are able to say things that are completely at odds to my expectations. I have only seen very few of them, but the ones that i do see will recur in my dreams.

So, in my opinion, based on the experiments i've done, there are definitely some dream characters that exhibit consciousness. How this happens, i believe that they are incredibly detailed replicas of the same processes that makes our consciousness. But then how are they separate? How do they have independent thoughts and memories? I think that their thoughts and memories form part of the subconscious, in the sense that they escape our conscious awareness. However, cognitive science is still in its infancy, and we are trying to explore the one most complicated piece of software known to man that's running on a piece of hardware that we still don't fully understand. In the end, time will tell what the right answer is.


5. Give the character a past

Just as your history has contributed to the person you are today, your character's history has made them into the person we see on the page. You should develop your character’s past as much as possible, but it’s especially important to create and zero in on memories that inform exactly what we see in the story.

  • What moments from their past have played a pivotal role in who they are now?
  • Do they have any suppressed memories?
  • What are some of their happiest memories?

Determine the Character Type of Your Protagonist

You will receive clues about personality through a character's words, actions, reactions, feelings, movements, thoughts, and mannerisms. Even a character's opinions can help you learn more about the individual, and you may discover that the person fits one of these stock character types:

  • Flat character. A flat character has one or two personality traits that don't change. The flat character can play a major or a minor role.
  • Round character. A round character has many complex traits those traits develop and change in a story. A round character seems more real than a flat character because real people are complex.
  • Stock or stereotype character. Stock characters are stereotypes, such as hot-tempered redheads, stingy businessmen, and absent-minded professors. They are often found in genre fiction (romance novels and mysteries, for example), and are usually flat characters. They are often used as a tool to move a plot forward.
  • Static character. A static character never changes. A loud, obnoxious "background" character who remains the same throughout the story is static. A boring character who is never changed by events is also static.
  • Dynamic character. Unlike a static character, a dynamic character does change and grow as the story unfolds. Dynamic characters respond to events and experience changes in attitude or outlook. The character might go through a transformation during the course of the storyline, and grow as a result of actions that took place.

Make an Outline

Writing a literary analysis outline can be considered one of the most critical steps in writing. A well-constructed character analysis outline will keep your thoughts and ideas organized.

Introduction:

Make the introduction to your paper brief and meaningful. It should hold together your entire essay and should spark the interest of your audience. Write a short description of the character in question.

Subdivide your body paragraphs into different ideas or areas regarding the character. Look at your professor’s rubric and make sure that you’ll be able to tackle all of the things required. You should also be provided with questions to be answered to formulate your analysis better. The body should answer the following questions:

  • What is the character’s physical appearance, personality, and background?
  • What are the conflicts the character experiences and how did he/she overcome them?
  • What can we learn from this character?
  • What is the meaning behind the character's actions? What motivates him/her?
  • What does the character do? How does he/she treat others? Is he/she fair or unjust?
  • What does the character say? What is his/her choice of words? Does he/she have a rich vocabulary?
  • How does the character describe themself? How do others describe him/her?
  • What words do you associate with the character? Perhaps a word like “hope”, “bravery”, or maybe even “freedom”?

Conclusion:

It’s time to master the secrets of how to write a conclusion for a character analysis. Your conclusion should also hold your ideas together and shape a final analysis statement. Mention things about the character’s conflicts that we could experience in real life. Additionally, you can write about how a character should’ve reacted to a certain situation.


A warning for any and all potential tulpamancers.

A tulpa might sound like the ideal thing for pretty much everyone, but you do have to think about creating one beforehand. Are you ready to accept the responsibility of creating another person? Are you going to keep going and not just give up after a month?

Creating a tulpa isn't something to be taken lightly. It is a huge commitment, and must be seen as such. While you may not yet consider tulpas to be living people, once you have one, they become a real person to you. They will be with you for the rest of your life. Tulpas are people just like you or me, and if you forget about them or get cold feet and stop, it will essentially kill them. No one should create a tulpa only to use them as a tool, rather than treat them as a person like you or me.

Now, don't get me wrong, tulpas are wonderful and it's not hard to keep them alive and kickin'. All they need is a bit of love and attention. You get to a point where you realize that if you didn't have a physical body, you would be just like them. Tulpas are beings who show intelligence as we do, and they show emotion as well. They love, they fear, they hurt, and all oftentimes stronger than their host does. They are creatures of empathy, and you must always remember that. There is a reason why first contact is often an emotional response from your tulpa. It reaches a point where your tulpa will mean as much to you as the closest of friends, and you will want them to be as happy as they can be.

In most cases, tulpas and their hosts coexist in harmony, doing things for and with each other, be it talking, cuddling, learning, or really anything. Above all, they give you the chance to become a better person and you help them grow as well. You can build off of each other because of your differences and in many cases you become a better person because of it.
They're capable of so much, but only if you give them the chance to do it.

TLDR: If this is too long for you to read, you shouldn't create a tulpa. Read it all and take it to heart.


What Your 25 Most Common Dreams Mean

Is anything better than pop psychology? Not in my shady-online-university textbook. Dream interpretation is one of the best ways to dabble in amateur Jungian theory (not to mention potentially understand your own mind better).

Here are some of the most common dream symbols, some of which are especially relevant to women. Get your metaphorical couch out: you're gonna to need to lie down for this.

Teeth

Here’s a rundown of teeth dreams , according to the ‘definitive’ dream symbol site Dream Moods:

Teeth Falling Out: "Signifies a lack of self-confidence and embarrassment. You are afraid that others will know of your short-comings. If you acted calmly in your dream, then it may point to how can make the best out of any situation."

Teeth Rotting/Decaying: "You may have said something that you shouldn’t have. You may have uttered some false or foul words and those words are coming back to haunt you."

Nice, Sparkly Teeth: "Fulfilled Wishes, Happiness." Julia Roberts-ness.

"To see hair in your dream signifies sexual virility, seduction, sensuality, vanity, and health," Dream Moods coos. "If your hair is knotted or tangled, then it is symbolic of uncertainty and confusion in your life."

Cutting Hair: "Loss of strength" (Samson, anyone?) or "you may be reshaping your thinking or ambitions and eliminating unwanted thoughts/habits." Or, you just broke up with your boyfriend.

Bugs in Hair: "Something is weighing on your mind that you are confused about. Perhaps you are making a big deal out of a minor matter. Alternatively, the dream refers to concerns over your public image."

Driving

Back in the day, we probably had nightmares about wolves. Now, we tend to have nightmares about car accidents. Makes sense, since that’s what’s most likely to kill us these days.

Dreams about driving are some of the most common, and here’s what they might mean, according to Dream Moods:

Trouble Steering/Seeing Road: Real shocker here: “you do not know where you are headed in life and what you really want to do with yourself.”

You’re The Passenger: “You are not in control of your life and following the goals of others instead of your own. If you are driving from the passenger side of a car, then it suggests that you are trying to gain control of the path that your life is taking.”

Driving Also = Sex: “Consider how you are driving and what kind of car you are driving and how it relates to your waking sex life. Or the dream may be a pun on your ‘drive’ or ambition.”

You're Naked!

This one is obviously nothing to be ashamed of . Dream Moods breaks it down:

Naked and Mortified: "You may be hiding something and are afraid that others can see right through you… Such anxieties are elevated especially in situations where you are trying to impress others. Perhaps you are in a new work environment or in a new relationship."

You’re Naked No One Notices: So, you’re having an emperor’s-new-clothes-moment. This "implies that your fears are unfounded no one will notice except you. You may be magnifying the situation and making an issue of nothing."

Naked and Unashamed: "Symbolizes your unrestricted freedom. You have nothing to hide and are proud of who you are. The dream is about a new sense of honesty, openness, and a carefree nature." Miley Cyrus haters be damned.

Flying

I’ve only had one flying dream in my life that I can remember, but man, was it awesome. According to Psychotherapist Jeffrey Sumber, flying dreams represent "freedom, momentum, or a lack thereof."

Apparently, if I want more flying dreams, I might want to consider thinking like a man. In a sad comment on the state of women's self esteem, Sumber says dudes believe they can fly more often.

"Often times, men in today’s world negotiate issues regarding freedom. There is great pressure to perform at work, at home, in the bedroom, financially, athletically, socially, and more and more, emotionally," Sumber mansplained to the Huffington Post. "Thus, it has become fairly common for many males to confront their feelings about this pressure as well as their relationship to the underlying desire to be free, by working it out in flying dreams."

Is he serious? We women negotiate all of those things! (And then some.) I’d pop-theorize it’s realizing we lack certain freedoms that keeps many of us women from flying as often as we should.

Sexy Sex Sex

Hopefully for you, your favorite wish fulfillment dream features sex — or at least the promise of it. So what does dreaming about sexy times mean, aside from the obvious?

"To dream about sex refers to the integration and merging of contrasting aspects of yourself. It represents psychological completion. You need to be more receptive and incorporate aspects of your dream sex partner into your own character," Dream Moods advises. "Consider the nature of the love-making. Was it passionate? Was it slow? Was it wild? The sex act parallels aspects of yourself that you wish to express."

Though, apparently, "a more direct interpretation of the dream may be your libido’s way of telling you that it has been too long since you have had sex."

Oral Sex: Not surprisingly, oral sex is all about a "willingness to give or receive pleasure/joy. It is symbolic of your creative energy and reaffirms that you are headed in the right direction in life." (Tell us something Beyoncé doesn’t already know.)

Orgasms: According to Dream Moods, the big-o "represents an exciting end to something. What have you just completed in your life?"

"Alternatively, the dream means that you are not getting enough sex. You need to relieve some of your sexual tensions." Yup, just like guys and wet dreams, it’s gotta come out some way. We suggest being conscious.

Hella Gay Sex

Obviously, it's just like regular sex, except for many people, more complicated:

The I’m-Having-Gay Sex-But-I’m-Not-Gay (Wait, Am I?) Dream: "Represents a union with aspects of yourself. It is symbolic of self-love, self-acceptance, and compassion. If you are uncomfortable with homosexuality in your dream, then it suggests some fears or anxieties femininity [or] you may be experiencing some insecurity in your relations with the opposite sex." Because maybe you’d like to have sex with them.

The Is My Man Gay? Dream: "Represents your anxieties and fears that he won’t like you back. By seeing him as gay, then it would be easier for you to dismiss your feelings for him because you have no chance with him. On a side note, it is common for expectant fathers to have dreams of homosexual encounters." Totally normal guys.

The I’m-Gay-in-Real-Life-AND-Having-Gay-Sex Dream: "Simply a reflection of your own self." Pop-psychology FTW.

And . You're Pregnant

Whoops, you had so much dream sex that now you’re dream-pregnant.

You’re Pregnant and Happy: "Symbolizes an aspect of yourself or some aspect of your personal life that is growing and developing. You may not be ready to talk about it or act on it. Being pregnant in your dream may also represent the birth of a new idea, direction, project or goal."

Pregnant and Baby is Dying Inside You: Yikes, this is a thing? "To dream that you are pregnant with the baby dying inside of you suggests that a project you had put a lot of effort into is falling apart and slowly deteriorating. Nothing is working out the way you had anticipated." Um, yeah, because there’s a friggin’ dream-baby dying in you.

Having an Abortion: "To dream that you have an abortion suggests that you are hindering and blocking your own growth. You may be hesitant in pursuing a new direction in your life due to fear, pressure, personal conflict or moral obligation." Not at all problematic.

Dream Moods concedes that of course an abortion dream “may also be a reflection of your own real-life abortion and thus serves as a way of healing from the trauma and working towards self-acceptance.”

Having an Illegal Abortion: “You are desperate to keep things exactly the same. If the abortion results in death, then it means that your approach to a problem is all wrong.” Or, that you live in one of these states.

Marriage

First comes baby, then comes marriage. But according to Dream Moods, a marriage dream doesn’t necessarily mean you want to get hitched. Instead, it could mean you're "undergoing an important developmental phase in your life. The dream may also represent the unification of formerly separate or opposite aspects of yourself. In particular, it is the union of masculine or feminine aspects of yourself."

Oddly, Dream Moods adds that dreaming of a proposal "suggests that some situation will take a turn for the worse." Probably your sex life.

Death

One favorite pop-psychology theory is that most people don’t tend to actually die in their dreams because it would mean suspending their ego. But apparently, plenty of people don't have that issue with follow-through and totally attend their own funeral.

"To dream that you die in your dream symbolizes inner changes, transformation, self-discovery and positive development that is happening within you or your life. You are undergoing a transitional phase and are becoming more enlightened or spiritual. Although such a dream may bring about feelings of fear and anxiety, it is no cause for alarm as it is often considered a positive symbol."


Character Description in Screenplays

What about when your character has an extra identity or an alias?

Sometime screenwriters might choose to introduce a character as something like ANGRY MAN or MASKED VIGILANTE before revealing the true identity of the character to the reader.

In this situation, how does a screenwriter keep things clear?

You can use an screenwriting extension.

Character Introduction with Alias Extension

It’s acceptable to place an alias in an extension for some brief clarity. This won’t bog the reader down by forcing them to read extra lines of action that laboriously spell out each time something like this occurs.

This is helpful in situations where a character disguises themselves throughout the story, whether it be multiple costumes or just one.


Edge ELA 2

The daughter resents being asked to work hard all the time, which her mother sees as laziness.

The daughter does not value talent or intelligence, whereas her mother believes that they are the two most important qualities a person can have.

The daughter wants to be valued for what she is, while the mother believes that the girl should always strive to be more.

The daughter believes that her mother should accept and love her, but the mother believes that she should help her daughter succeed.

The mother has moved to the United States from China and wants to leave Chinese traditions behind, but the daughter clings to her roots in China.

The mother and daughter have moved from China to the United States, and both feel drawn to Chinese cultural values, customs, and styles of clothing.

The mother has moved to the United States from China and wants to preserve the Chinese family structure, but the daughter wants independence like a US teenager.

The doorbell rang, but Manny didn't answer he felt too exhausted for visitors.

When the temperature suddenly dropped, Lacey ran into a heated shop to warm up.

After she cheated on the exam, Crystal's guilt finally drove her to confess to her teacher.

"America was where all my mother's hopes lay. She had come here in 1949 after losing everything in China: her mother and father, her family home, her first husband, and two daughters, twin baby girls. But she never looked back with regret. There were so many ways for things to get better."

"In all of my imaginings, I was filled with a sense that I would soon become perfect. My mother and father would adore me. I would be beyond reproach. I would never feel the need to sulk for anything."

"Before going to bed that night, I looked in the mirror above the bathroom sink and when I saw only my face staring back—and that it would always be this ordinary face—I began to cry. Such a sad, ugly girl! I made high-pitched noises like a crazed animal, trying to scratch out the face in the mirror."

"My mother slapped me. 'Who ask you be genius?' she shouted. 'Only ask you be your best. For you sake. You think I want you to be genius? Hnnh! What for! Who ask you!'

'So ungrateful,' I heard her mutter in Chinese, 'If she had as much talent as she has temper, she would be famous now.'"


30 Common Dream Symbols

  1. Animals often represent the part of your psyche that feels connected to nature and survival. Being chased by a predator suggests you're holding back repressed emotions like fear or aggression.
  2. Babies can symbolize a literal desire to produce offspring, or your own vulnerability or need to feel loved. They can also signify a new start.
  3. Being chased is one of the most common dream symbols in all cultures. It means you're feeling threatened, so reflect on who's chasing you (they may be symbolic) and why they're a possible threat in real life.


Brown Girl Dreaming Character List

The author and main character of Brown Girl Dreaming. The book follows Jacqueline from birth until fifth grade, over which time she explores concepts of race, home, nature, learning, and writing. Jacqueline has strong positive relationships with her mother, sister, two brothers, grandmother Georgiana, and especially her grandfather Gunnar. She feels a great loss when Gunnar, who she and her siblings call Daddy, dies. Jacqueline loves to tell stories, some of which others consider lies. Her dream is to become a writer, and she writes her first book, a collection of poems about butterflies, in elementary school.


Determine the Character Type of Your Protagonist

You will receive clues about personality through a character's words, actions, reactions, feelings, movements, thoughts, and mannerisms. Even a character's opinions can help you learn more about the individual, and you may discover that the person fits one of these stock character types:

  • Flat character. A flat character has one or two personality traits that don't change. The flat character can play a major or a minor role.
  • Round character. A round character has many complex traits those traits develop and change in a story. A round character seems more real than a flat character because real people are complex.
  • Stock or stereotype character. Stock characters are stereotypes, such as hot-tempered redheads, stingy businessmen, and absent-minded professors. They are often found in genre fiction (romance novels and mysteries, for example), and are usually flat characters. They are often used as a tool to move a plot forward.
  • Static character. A static character never changes. A loud, obnoxious "background" character who remains the same throughout the story is static. A boring character who is never changed by events is also static.
  • Dynamic character. Unlike a static character, a dynamic character does change and grow as the story unfolds. Dynamic characters respond to events and experience changes in attitude or outlook. The character might go through a transformation during the course of the storyline, and grow as a result of actions that took place.

5. Give the character a past

Just as your history has contributed to the person you are today, your character's history has made them into the person we see on the page. You should develop your character’s past as much as possible, but it’s especially important to create and zero in on memories that inform exactly what we see in the story.

  • What moments from their past have played a pivotal role in who they are now?
  • Do they have any suppressed memories?
  • What are some of their happiest memories?

Brown Girl Dreaming Character List

The author and main character of Brown Girl Dreaming. The book follows Jacqueline from birth until fifth grade, over which time she explores concepts of race, home, nature, learning, and writing. Jacqueline has strong positive relationships with her mother, sister, two brothers, grandmother Georgiana, and especially her grandfather Gunnar. She feels a great loss when Gunnar, who she and her siblings call Daddy, dies. Jacqueline loves to tell stories, some of which others consider lies. Her dream is to become a writer, and she writes her first book, a collection of poems about butterflies, in elementary school.


Make an Outline

Writing a literary analysis outline can be considered one of the most critical steps in writing. A well-constructed character analysis outline will keep your thoughts and ideas organized.

Introduction:

Make the introduction to your paper brief and meaningful. It should hold together your entire essay and should spark the interest of your audience. Write a short description of the character in question.

Subdivide your body paragraphs into different ideas or areas regarding the character. Look at your professor’s rubric and make sure that you’ll be able to tackle all of the things required. You should also be provided with questions to be answered to formulate your analysis better. The body should answer the following questions:

  • What is the character’s physical appearance, personality, and background?
  • What are the conflicts the character experiences and how did he/she overcome them?
  • What can we learn from this character?
  • What is the meaning behind the character's actions? What motivates him/her?
  • What does the character do? How does he/she treat others? Is he/she fair or unjust?
  • What does the character say? What is his/her choice of words? Does he/she have a rich vocabulary?
  • How does the character describe themself? How do others describe him/her?
  • What words do you associate with the character? Perhaps a word like “hope”, “bravery”, or maybe even “freedom”?

Conclusion:

It’s time to master the secrets of how to write a conclusion for a character analysis. Your conclusion should also hold your ideas together and shape a final analysis statement. Mention things about the character’s conflicts that we could experience in real life. Additionally, you can write about how a character should’ve reacted to a certain situation.


30 Common Dream Symbols

  1. Animals often represent the part of your psyche that feels connected to nature and survival. Being chased by a predator suggests you're holding back repressed emotions like fear or aggression.
  2. Babies can symbolize a literal desire to produce offspring, or your own vulnerability or need to feel loved. They can also signify a new start.
  3. Being chased is one of the most common dream symbols in all cultures. It means you're feeling threatened, so reflect on who's chasing you (they may be symbolic) and why they're a possible threat in real life.


What Your 25 Most Common Dreams Mean

Is anything better than pop psychology? Not in my shady-online-university textbook. Dream interpretation is one of the best ways to dabble in amateur Jungian theory (not to mention potentially understand your own mind better).

Here are some of the most common dream symbols, some of which are especially relevant to women. Get your metaphorical couch out: you're gonna to need to lie down for this.

Teeth

Here’s a rundown of teeth dreams , according to the ‘definitive’ dream symbol site Dream Moods:

Teeth Falling Out: "Signifies a lack of self-confidence and embarrassment. You are afraid that others will know of your short-comings. If you acted calmly in your dream, then it may point to how can make the best out of any situation."

Teeth Rotting/Decaying: "You may have said something that you shouldn’t have. You may have uttered some false or foul words and those words are coming back to haunt you."

Nice, Sparkly Teeth: "Fulfilled Wishes, Happiness." Julia Roberts-ness.

"To see hair in your dream signifies sexual virility, seduction, sensuality, vanity, and health," Dream Moods coos. "If your hair is knotted or tangled, then it is symbolic of uncertainty and confusion in your life."

Cutting Hair: "Loss of strength" (Samson, anyone?) or "you may be reshaping your thinking or ambitions and eliminating unwanted thoughts/habits." Or, you just broke up with your boyfriend.

Bugs in Hair: "Something is weighing on your mind that you are confused about. Perhaps you are making a big deal out of a minor matter. Alternatively, the dream refers to concerns over your public image."

Driving

Back in the day, we probably had nightmares about wolves. Now, we tend to have nightmares about car accidents. Makes sense, since that’s what’s most likely to kill us these days.

Dreams about driving are some of the most common, and here’s what they might mean, according to Dream Moods:

Trouble Steering/Seeing Road: Real shocker here: “you do not know where you are headed in life and what you really want to do with yourself.”

You’re The Passenger: “You are not in control of your life and following the goals of others instead of your own. If you are driving from the passenger side of a car, then it suggests that you are trying to gain control of the path that your life is taking.”

Driving Also = Sex: “Consider how you are driving and what kind of car you are driving and how it relates to your waking sex life. Or the dream may be a pun on your ‘drive’ or ambition.”

You're Naked!

This one is obviously nothing to be ashamed of . Dream Moods breaks it down:

Naked and Mortified: "You may be hiding something and are afraid that others can see right through you… Such anxieties are elevated especially in situations where you are trying to impress others. Perhaps you are in a new work environment or in a new relationship."

You’re Naked No One Notices: So, you’re having an emperor’s-new-clothes-moment. This "implies that your fears are unfounded no one will notice except you. You may be magnifying the situation and making an issue of nothing."

Naked and Unashamed: "Symbolizes your unrestricted freedom. You have nothing to hide and are proud of who you are. The dream is about a new sense of honesty, openness, and a carefree nature." Miley Cyrus haters be damned.

Flying

I’ve only had one flying dream in my life that I can remember, but man, was it awesome. According to Psychotherapist Jeffrey Sumber, flying dreams represent "freedom, momentum, or a lack thereof."

Apparently, if I want more flying dreams, I might want to consider thinking like a man. In a sad comment on the state of women's self esteem, Sumber says dudes believe they can fly more often.

"Often times, men in today’s world negotiate issues regarding freedom. There is great pressure to perform at work, at home, in the bedroom, financially, athletically, socially, and more and more, emotionally," Sumber mansplained to the Huffington Post. "Thus, it has become fairly common for many males to confront their feelings about this pressure as well as their relationship to the underlying desire to be free, by working it out in flying dreams."

Is he serious? We women negotiate all of those things! (And then some.) I’d pop-theorize it’s realizing we lack certain freedoms that keeps many of us women from flying as often as we should.

Sexy Sex Sex

Hopefully for you, your favorite wish fulfillment dream features sex — or at least the promise of it. So what does dreaming about sexy times mean, aside from the obvious?

"To dream about sex refers to the integration and merging of contrasting aspects of yourself. It represents psychological completion. You need to be more receptive and incorporate aspects of your dream sex partner into your own character," Dream Moods advises. "Consider the nature of the love-making. Was it passionate? Was it slow? Was it wild? The sex act parallels aspects of yourself that you wish to express."

Though, apparently, "a more direct interpretation of the dream may be your libido’s way of telling you that it has been too long since you have had sex."

Oral Sex: Not surprisingly, oral sex is all about a "willingness to give or receive pleasure/joy. It is symbolic of your creative energy and reaffirms that you are headed in the right direction in life." (Tell us something Beyoncé doesn’t already know.)

Orgasms: According to Dream Moods, the big-o "represents an exciting end to something. What have you just completed in your life?"

"Alternatively, the dream means that you are not getting enough sex. You need to relieve some of your sexual tensions." Yup, just like guys and wet dreams, it’s gotta come out some way. We suggest being conscious.

Hella Gay Sex

Obviously, it's just like regular sex, except for many people, more complicated:

The I’m-Having-Gay Sex-But-I’m-Not-Gay (Wait, Am I?) Dream: "Represents a union with aspects of yourself. It is symbolic of self-love, self-acceptance, and compassion. If you are uncomfortable with homosexuality in your dream, then it suggests some fears or anxieties femininity [or] you may be experiencing some insecurity in your relations with the opposite sex." Because maybe you’d like to have sex with them.

The Is My Man Gay? Dream: "Represents your anxieties and fears that he won’t like you back. By seeing him as gay, then it would be easier for you to dismiss your feelings for him because you have no chance with him. On a side note, it is common for expectant fathers to have dreams of homosexual encounters." Totally normal guys.

The I’m-Gay-in-Real-Life-AND-Having-Gay-Sex Dream: "Simply a reflection of your own self." Pop-psychology FTW.

And . You're Pregnant

Whoops, you had so much dream sex that now you’re dream-pregnant.

You’re Pregnant and Happy: "Symbolizes an aspect of yourself or some aspect of your personal life that is growing and developing. You may not be ready to talk about it or act on it. Being pregnant in your dream may also represent the birth of a new idea, direction, project or goal."

Pregnant and Baby is Dying Inside You: Yikes, this is a thing? "To dream that you are pregnant with the baby dying inside of you suggests that a project you had put a lot of effort into is falling apart and slowly deteriorating. Nothing is working out the way you had anticipated." Um, yeah, because there’s a friggin’ dream-baby dying in you.

Having an Abortion: "To dream that you have an abortion suggests that you are hindering and blocking your own growth. You may be hesitant in pursuing a new direction in your life due to fear, pressure, personal conflict or moral obligation." Not at all problematic.

Dream Moods concedes that of course an abortion dream “may also be a reflection of your own real-life abortion and thus serves as a way of healing from the trauma and working towards self-acceptance.”

Having an Illegal Abortion: “You are desperate to keep things exactly the same. If the abortion results in death, then it means that your approach to a problem is all wrong.” Or, that you live in one of these states.

Marriage

First comes baby, then comes marriage. But according to Dream Moods, a marriage dream doesn’t necessarily mean you want to get hitched. Instead, it could mean you're "undergoing an important developmental phase in your life. The dream may also represent the unification of formerly separate or opposite aspects of yourself. In particular, it is the union of masculine or feminine aspects of yourself."

Oddly, Dream Moods adds that dreaming of a proposal "suggests that some situation will take a turn for the worse." Probably your sex life.

Death

One favorite pop-psychology theory is that most people don’t tend to actually die in their dreams because it would mean suspending their ego. But apparently, plenty of people don't have that issue with follow-through and totally attend their own funeral.

"To dream that you die in your dream symbolizes inner changes, transformation, self-discovery and positive development that is happening within you or your life. You are undergoing a transitional phase and are becoming more enlightened or spiritual. Although such a dream may bring about feelings of fear and anxiety, it is no cause for alarm as it is often considered a positive symbol."


A warning for any and all potential tulpamancers.

A tulpa might sound like the ideal thing for pretty much everyone, but you do have to think about creating one beforehand. Are you ready to accept the responsibility of creating another person? Are you going to keep going and not just give up after a month?

Creating a tulpa isn't something to be taken lightly. It is a huge commitment, and must be seen as such. While you may not yet consider tulpas to be living people, once you have one, they become a real person to you. They will be with you for the rest of your life. Tulpas are people just like you or me, and if you forget about them or get cold feet and stop, it will essentially kill them. No one should create a tulpa only to use them as a tool, rather than treat them as a person like you or me.

Now, don't get me wrong, tulpas are wonderful and it's not hard to keep them alive and kickin'. All they need is a bit of love and attention. You get to a point where you realize that if you didn't have a physical body, you would be just like them. Tulpas are beings who show intelligence as we do, and they show emotion as well. They love, they fear, they hurt, and all oftentimes stronger than their host does. They are creatures of empathy, and you must always remember that. There is a reason why first contact is often an emotional response from your tulpa. It reaches a point where your tulpa will mean as much to you as the closest of friends, and you will want them to be as happy as they can be.

In most cases, tulpas and their hosts coexist in harmony, doing things for and with each other, be it talking, cuddling, learning, or really anything. Above all, they give you the chance to become a better person and you help them grow as well. You can build off of each other because of your differences and in many cases you become a better person because of it.
They're capable of so much, but only if you give them the chance to do it.

TLDR: If this is too long for you to read, you shouldn't create a tulpa. Read it all and take it to heart.


Character Description in Screenplays

What about when your character has an extra identity or an alias?

Sometime screenwriters might choose to introduce a character as something like ANGRY MAN or MASKED VIGILANTE before revealing the true identity of the character to the reader.

In this situation, how does a screenwriter keep things clear?

You can use an screenwriting extension.

Character Introduction with Alias Extension

It’s acceptable to place an alias in an extension for some brief clarity. This won’t bog the reader down by forcing them to read extra lines of action that laboriously spell out each time something like this occurs.

This is helpful in situations where a character disguises themselves throughout the story, whether it be multiple costumes or just one.


Edge ELA 2

The daughter resents being asked to work hard all the time, which her mother sees as laziness.

The daughter does not value talent or intelligence, whereas her mother believes that they are the two most important qualities a person can have.

The daughter wants to be valued for what she is, while the mother believes that the girl should always strive to be more.

The daughter believes that her mother should accept and love her, but the mother believes that she should help her daughter succeed.

The mother has moved to the United States from China and wants to leave Chinese traditions behind, but the daughter clings to her roots in China.

The mother and daughter have moved from China to the United States, and both feel drawn to Chinese cultural values, customs, and styles of clothing.

The mother has moved to the United States from China and wants to preserve the Chinese family structure, but the daughter wants independence like a US teenager.

The doorbell rang, but Manny didn't answer he felt too exhausted for visitors.

When the temperature suddenly dropped, Lacey ran into a heated shop to warm up.

After she cheated on the exam, Crystal's guilt finally drove her to confess to her teacher.

"America was where all my mother's hopes lay. She had come here in 1949 after losing everything in China: her mother and father, her family home, her first husband, and two daughters, twin baby girls. But she never looked back with regret. There were so many ways for things to get better."

"In all of my imaginings, I was filled with a sense that I would soon become perfect. My mother and father would adore me. I would be beyond reproach. I would never feel the need to sulk for anything."

"Before going to bed that night, I looked in the mirror above the bathroom sink and when I saw only my face staring back—and that it would always be this ordinary face—I began to cry. Such a sad, ugly girl! I made high-pitched noises like a crazed animal, trying to scratch out the face in the mirror."

"My mother slapped me. 'Who ask you be genius?' she shouted. 'Only ask you be your best. For you sake. You think I want you to be genius? Hnnh! What for! Who ask you!'

'So ungrateful,' I heard her mutter in Chinese, 'If she had as much talent as she has temper, she would be famous now.'"


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